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Three Perfect Days: Chengdu

It may not be as big or fast-paced as its coastal counterparts, but this Middle Kingdom city is providing a compelling vision of the ways tradition can prosper in New China

Author Benjamin Carlson Photography Algirdas Bakas

The pagoda-style Anshun covered bridge with the lights of Chengdu at dusk

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Chengdu has always been known for its easy, some might say lazy, pace of life. Even its nicknames connote a life of leisure: Brocade City, Hibiscus City, Perfect City. Migrants from Beijing and Shanghai quip that the locals don’t so much walk as mosey.

Even as an infusion of government investment has caused the city to blossom into an economic powerhouse, drawing Fortune 500 companies deep into the misty mountains of Sichuan, Chengdu has retained its reputation for prizing the finer things in life. People here may work as hard as their brethren in China’s frenetic eastern and southern metropolises, but they also make time to while away an afternoon drinking tea, playing mah-jongg or dancing in a park.

Chengdu is best known, however, for its food: the mouth-numbing peppercorns, the blood-red Sichuan hotpot, the streetside “little eats.” It’s also the kind of place where you can spend the afternoon having your chi retooled at a luxury spa and attend an indie rock show before turning in.

Welcome to the New China.

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